The Worgle Corporate Identity Handbook.

The Worgle Corporate Identity Handbook.
This project has taught me how to look at intricate details of a design and how to implicate rules and restrictions for the use of those designs. Here, I am focused on the identity of an imaginary design firm that I dreamt up. By restricting proportions and typefaces, sizes and colour, I am able to maintain a corporate identity that portrays the company in exactly the manner in which I would like it to. The more detailed an thorough, the more precise the identity of the company. However, in hindsight, I also learned that sometimes a company wants to be more flexible in order to give off a more friendly vibe. I learned that by looking at every detail and putting everything under the microscope, I am able to even define the boundaries of the flexibility I will allow. Though this applies more theoretically to my needs than it does directly. This project has shown me that only by scrutinizing every detail of my work and being absolutely meticulous, can I truly understand how my work will make people feel. In terms of architecture, that means I must analyze structural, functional, and aesthetic details in order to create guidelines for my projects that my engineers and architects can use to help me plan and develop my work. Rather than using the handbook as a book of restrictions, I now see the handbook as a means of eliminating aspects of the research and design process that take away from my original goals, standards, and criteria. This means focusing on greener materials if my project is a green project by expressing those concerns in a guidebook. It also means making legal restrictions known and available to everybody that has access to the handbook. Whatever the reason, this specific piece of school work has taught me how to go about creating an identity for a project, and how to demonstrate that identity to those who need the criteria.

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